Windows PC Keyboard Beeps Instead of Types? Turn Off “Filter Keys”

A common side effect of technical aptitude is the inevitable request “Can you help me with my computer?” Whether this side effect is an upside or downside depends on the people involved. Recently I was asked to help resurrect a computer that had been shelved due to “the keyboard stopped working.”

Before I received the hardware, I was told the computer was an Asus T300L allowing me to do a bit of research beforehand. This is a Windows 8 era touchscreen tablet/laptop convertible along the lines of a Microsoft Surface Pro or the HP Split X2. This added a twist: the T300L keyboard base not only worked while docked, but it could also continue working as a wireless keyboard + touchpad when separated from the screen. This could add a few hardware-related variables for me to investigate.

When I was finally presented with the machine, I watched the owner type their Windows login password using the keyboard. “Wait, I thought you said the keyboard didn’t work?” “Oh, it works fine for the password. It stops working after I log in.”

Ah, the hazard of imprecision of the English language. When I was first told “keyboard doesn’t work” my mind went to loose electrical connections. And when I learned of the wireless keyboard + touchpad base, I added the possibility of wireless settings (device pairing, etc.) I had a hardware-oriented checklist ready and now I can throw it all away. If the keyboard worked for typing in Windows password, the problem is not hardware.

Once the Windows 8 desktop was presented, I could see what “keyboard stopped working” meant: every keypress resulted in an audible beep but no character typed on screen. A web search with these symptoms found this Microsoft forum thread titled “Keyboard Beeps and won’t type” with the (apparently common) answer to check Windows’ Ease of Access center. I made my way to that menu (as the touchscreen worked fine) and found that Filter Keys were turned on.

Filter Keys is a feature that helps users living with motor control challenges that result in shaky hands. This could result in pressing a key multiple times when they only meant to press a key once or jostling adjacent keys during that keypress. Filter Keys slow the computer’s keyboard response, so they only register long and deliberate presses as a single action. Rapid tap and release of a key — which is what usually happens in mainstream typing action — are ignored and only a beep is played. Which is great, if the user knew how to use Filter Keys and intentionally turned it on.

In this case, nobody knows how this feature got turned on for this computer, but apparently it was not intentional. They didn’t recognize the symptoms of Filter Keys being active. Lacking that knowledge, they could only communicate their observation as “the keyboard stopped working.” I guess that description isn’t completely wrong, even if it led me down the wrong path in my initial research. Ah well. Once Filter Keys were turned off, everything is fine again.

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