Fusion 360 vs. Onshape: Multiple Views

Advantage: Onshape.

When working on a CAD project, the majority of my time is spent focused on a single view of my subject. But when it comes to align parts into an assembly, it is very useful to have multiple views, and this is where Fusion 360 falls behind Onshape.

Fusion 360 can toggle between the standard single-view mode and a quad-view mode. In quad-view mode, the window starts with four equal-sized views and the user can adjust the relative sizes within the window.

F360MultiView

This is a bare-bones baseline level of functionality. I can work with it, but I’m not happy with it. Onshape does it better.

Onshape takes advantage of the fact it runs in a browser. You can have multiple browser windows open on the same Onshape project, and each window can be a different view. Onshape infrastructure keeps all the windows in sync – any change made in one view is immediately reflected in all the others. Want four views? Open four windows. Want 6 views? (top/bottom/left/right/front/back) Open six windows.

And since these Onshape views are all separate windows, they can be placed on different monitors to build a great multi-monitor workspace. Fusion 360 is limited to a single window. Trying to use Fusion 360 across multiple monitors means manually scaling the application window across them. Toolbars get cut in half, resolution doesn’t match, problems left and right. It is not ideal.

What about opening multiple instances of Fusion 360, one for each monitor? It turns out that doesn’t work because the instances are unaware of each other. Change made in one instance is not reflected in the others until the user hits “Save” in one instance and “Reload” in all the other open instances.

The obvious conclusion is that Fusion 360 works best on a single high-resolution display instead of multiple screens. Sadly this is also false. As mentioned in my first Fusion 360 vs. Onshape comparison, Fusion 360 does not scale to high-resolution displays (4K, Retina, etc.) whereas Onshape takes advantage of the fact browser makers have long since handled the problem of scaling for high resolution.

Since the time of my first comparison Autodesk knowledge base published a workaround for running Fusion 360 on high-resolution displays. With these workarounds, Fusion 360 now runs poorly at 4K, which I guess is an improvement over not running at all.

With more multi-view options, including multi-monitor, plus superior support for high-resolution displays, Onshape handily wins this comparison, and they know it.

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