Preparing For ROS 2 Transition Looks Complicated

Before I decided to embark on a ROS Melodic software stack for Sawppy, I thought about ignoring the long legacy of ROS 1 and going to the newer ROS 2 built on more modern infrastructure. I mean, I told people to look into it, so I should walk the walk right? Eventually I decided against putting Sawppy on ROS 2, the deal breaker was that the Raspberry Pi is not a tier 1 platform for ROS 2. This means there’s no guarantee on regular binary releases for it, or that it will always function. I may have to build my own arm32 binaries for Raspbian from source code, and I would be on my own to verify functionality. I’ve done a superficial survey of other candidates for a Sawppy brain, but for today Sawppy is still thinking with a Raspberry Pi.

But even after making that decision I wanted to keep ROS 2 in mind. Open Robotics has a  ROS 2 migration guide for helping ROS node authors navigate the transition, and it doesn’t look trivial to me. But then again, I don’t have the ROS expertise to accurately judge the effort involved.

The biggest headache for some nodes will be the lack of Python 2 support. Mainly impact ROS nodes with a long legacy of Python 2 code, it does not impact a new project written against ROS Melodic which is supposed to support Python 3.

The next headache is the fact that it’s not possible to write if/else blocks to allow a single ROS node to simultaneously support ROS 1 and 2. The recommendation is to put all specialized logic into generic non-ROS-specific code in a library that can be shared. Then have separate code tailored to the infrastructure paradigms of ROS and ROS 2. This way all the code integrating with a ROS platform can be separated, but calling into a shared library.

And it also sounds like the ROS/ROS 2 build systems conflict so they can’t even coexist side by side at the same time. Different variants of a node have to live in separate branches of a repository, with the shared library code merged across branches as development continues. Leaving ROS/ROS 2 specific infrastructure code live in their separate branches.

I can see why a vocal fraction of ROS developers are unhappy with this “best practice”. And since ROS is open source, I foresee one or more groups joining forces to keep ROS 1 alive and working with old code even as Open Robotics move on to ROS 2. Right now there are noises being made from people who proclaims to do a similar thing, saying they’ll keep Python 2 alive past official EOL. In a few years we can look back and see if those Python 2 holdouts actually thrived, and we can also see how the ROS 1/ROS 2 situation has evolved.

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