Window Shopping: LabVIEW 2019

After taking a quick look over Keysight VEE, I switched focus to LabVIEW by National Instruments. I don’t know how directly these two products compete in the broader market, but I do know they have some overlap relating to instrument control. I had some exposure to LabVIEW many years ago thanks to LEGO Mindstorms, which had used a version of LabVIEW for programming the NXT brick. Back then the Mindstorm-specific version was very closely guarded and, when I lost track of my CD-ROM, I was out of luck because neither NI nor LEGO made it available for download. Thankfully that has since changed and the Mindstorm flavor of LabVIEW is available for download.

But I’m not focused on LEGO right now, today’s aim is to see how I might fulfill my general computer control goals with this tool. For that information I was thankful National Instruments made help files for LabVIEW available for download so I can investigate without a full download and installation of the full tool suite. It took a bit of hunting around to find them, though, and the download page was titled LabVIEW 2018 but it has a download link for the 2019 help files.

I found a help page “Serial Port Communication” under the section:

  • Controlling Instruments
    • Types of Instruments

And it assumes the user would only be controlling devices that can communicate to VISA protocol, not general serial communication. There were more serial communication information in the section:

  • VISA Resource
    • I/O Session
      • Serial Instr

There’s also an online tutorial for instrument communication. This page has a flowchart that implied there’s a “Direct I/O” that we can fallback to if all else fails, but I found no mention for performing this direct I/O in the help files.

The graphics rendering side was more straightforward. There’s no mention of ActiveX control here, but under:

  • Fundamentals
    • Graphs and Charts
      • Graphics and Sound VIs

There are multiple pages of information for a “2D Picture Control” with drawing primitives like points, lines, arcs, etc. Details on this drawing API are found under:

  • VI and Function Reference
    • Programming VIs and Functions
      • Graphics & Sound VIs
        • Picture Plot VIs

However, it’s not clear this functionality scales to complex drawings with thousands (or more) of primitives. It certainly wouldn’t be the first time I used an API that stumbled as the data size grew.

So the drawing side looks workable pending a question mark on how well it scales, but the serial communication side is blocked. Until I find a way to perform that mystical direct I/O, I’m going to set LabVIEW aside and look at its sibling LabWindows/CVI.

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