Window Shopping: OpenAI Spinning Up in Deep Reinforcement Learning

I was very encouraged after my second look at Unity ML-Agents. When I first looked at it a few years ago, it motivated me to look at the OpenAI Gym for training AI agents via reinforcement learning. But once I finished the “Hello World” examples, I got lost trying to get further and quickly became distracted by other more fruitful project ideas. With this past experience in mind, I set out to find something more instructive for a beginner and found OpenAI’s guide “Spinning Up in Deep RL“. It opened with the following text:

Welcome to Spinning Up in Deep RL! This is an educational resource produced by OpenAI that makes it easier to learn about deep reinforcement learning (deep RL).

This sounds exactly like what I needed. Jackpot! At first I thought this was something new since my last look, but the timeline at the bottom of the page indicated this was already available when I last looked at reinforcement learning resources on OpenAI. I had missed it! I regret the lost opportunity, but at least I’ve found it this time.

The problem with finding such a resource a few years after publication is that it may already be out of date. The field of deep learning moves so fast! I’m pretty sure the fundamentals will still be applicable, but the state of the art has certainly moved on. I’m also worried about the example code that goes with this resource, which looks stale at first glance. For example, it launched with examples that used the now-deprecated TensorFlow 1 API. (Instead of the current TensorFlow 2 API.) I don’t care to learn TF1 just for the sake of this course, but fortunately in January 2020 they added alternative examples implemented using PyTorch instead. If I’m lucky, PyTorch hasn’t made a major version breaking change and I could still use those examples.

In addition to the PyTorch examples, there’s another upside of finding this resource now instead of later. For 3D environment simulations OpenAI uses MuJoCo. When I looked at OpenAI Gyms earlier, running the 3D environments require a MuJoCo license that costs $500/year and I couldn’t justify that money for playing around. But good news! MuJoCo is now free to use.

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