Ubuntu Core 18 Web Kiosk Experiment on Dell Inspiron 11 3180

While experimenting with Ubuntu Core 18 on a 14-year old Dell Latitude X1, I ran into problems and wanted to verify it was a hardware support issue and not a mistake on my part. So I brought my much younger Inspiron 11 (3180) up on Ubuntu Core 18 as well. It verified the issue was indeed hardware support and not my mistake, hampering functionality on the Latitude X1.

After I got my answer, I thought since I’ve already got this Inspiron 11 up and running, I might as well continue experimenting on it. I proceeded to follow through the rest of the steps in the tutorial for setting up a web kiosk on Ubuntu Core. Since this machine had recent hardware, I encountered no hardware issues and got a dedicated web kiosk machine up and running.

Browsing a few web sites, basic browser functionality seem to be present. The first missing functionality I noticed was a lack of sound. A little poking confirmed that Linux audio system ALSA is not installed as part of Ubuntu Core. If someone wants sound on their Ubuntu Core machine, they’ll have to install it. This is fits with my expectation for a bare minimum “Core” OS.

Another feature I noticed is the lack of persistent state. As far as I can tell, everything is ephemeral and lost upon reset. No cookies are preserved across sessions, and it appears the cache is flushed as well. Whether this is a bug or a feature depends on application. It would be desirable for public use web terminal where we really want to wipe everything and start over for every new user.

And it isn’t intended to be a general use web browser, anyway. The cursor can be hidden and so can the navigation bar. I enabled the navigation bar expecting a normal browser tool bar, but it is actually a very minimalist bar with a few buttons like back and refresh. There is no URL input field, as appropriate for a kiosk dedicated to serving specific pages.

Sometimes this is exactly what I would need making Ubuntu Core an ideal bare-minimum OS for an Intel-based machine. But in this day and age, those aren’t our only options. Projects along these lines are also commonly built with a Raspberry Pi. How well does Ubuntu Core work on a Raspberry Pi, compared to Raspberry Pi’s standard Raspbian OS?

Dell Latitude X1 Running Ubuntu Core 18: No Graphics But CH341 USB Serial Works

It was a pleasant surprise to see the Ubuntu Core 18 up and running on a 14-year old Dell Latitude X1, even more pleasant to see it is lightweight enough to be speedy and responsive on such old and slow hardware. But given its age, I knew not to expect everything to work on the stock i386 image. There’s no way they can package a comprehensive set of device drivers on such a compact package. I speculate it was not the intent, either. Ubuntu Core is targeted to embedded projects where it is typical to generate an OS image custom tailored to the specific hardware. So the fact it mostly works out of the box is a tremendous bonus, and the missing hardware support is not a bug.

That said, I’m not terribly interested in generating the custom device tree (or whatever mechanism Ubuntu Core uses) to utilize all peripherals on this Latitude X1. I’m more interested in working with what I already have on hand. During initial configuration I already learned that the wireless module did not work properly. What works, and what doesn’t?

Again I’m not interested in an exhaustive list, I just wanted to find enough to enable interesting projects. Getting this far meant text output and keyboard input functions in addition to wired networking. The next thing to try is to activate the graphics subsystem and mouse input. Looking on Ubuntu’s tutorial web site, I found the web kiosk example which would test hardware necessary to offer a useful set of web-related functionality.

Following the tutorial steps, I could get the machine to switch display modes, but it never got as far as showing a web browser, just a few lines I didn’t understand. At this point I wasn’t sure if I followed the procedures correctly or if the hardware failed, so I duplicated the steps with Ubuntu Core 18 running on my modern Dell Inspiron 11 (3180) laptop. I saw a web browser, so the procedures were correct and the hardware is at fault. Oh well.

Comparing what’s on screen after starting mir-kiosk on both machines, I see the gibberish lines on the X1 actually resemble the mouse arrow but distorted and scattered across interleaved lines. Lending to the hypothesis that video support on stock Ubuntu Core 18 i386 image needs some tweaks before it can support the video hardware on board a Latitude X1. The fact some lines showed up tells me it’s close, but I’m choosing not to invest the time to make it work.

The next idea is to test USB serial communications. I plugged in an Arduino Nano knockoff with the CH341 USB-serial chip and ran dmesg to learn the device was picked up, understood, and assigned a ttyUSB device path. This particular Arduino was already flashed with a sketch that sent data through the serial port, and as a crude test I used cat /dev/ttyUSB0 to see if anything comes up: it did! This is wonderful news. The Latitude X1 can act as high-level processor counterpart to a lower level controller communicating over USB serial opening up project possibilities. I’ll have to think on that for a while.

Dell Latitude X1 Now Running Ubuntu Core 18

About two years ago, an old friend was returned to me: a 2005 vintage Dell Latitude X1. It struggled to run desktop software of 2017 but speed wasn’t the point – the impressive part was that it could run software of 2017 at all. It was never a speed demon even when new, as it sacrificed raw performance for its thin and light (for its day) construction. Over the past two years, I would occasionally dust it off just to see it still running, but as software got more complex it has struggled more and more to act as a modern personal computer.

When an up-to-date Ubuntu 16 LTS desktop edition takes over 10 minutes to boot to the login screen, I had to concede it’s well past time to stop trying to run it as a desktop computer. I hate to give up on this oddball hobby to keep an old machine running modern up to date operating systems, but an interesting idea came up to keep things going: How about running a lighter-weight text-based operating system?

The overburdened desktop Ubuntu was erased to make room for Ubuntu 16.04.6 server. This is a much lighter-weight operating system. As one point of measure, it now takes only about 55 seconds from pressing the power button to a text login prompt. This is much more tolerable than >10 minutes to boot to a graphical login screen.

After I logged in, it gave me a notification that Ubuntu 18 server is available for upgrade. I’ve noticed that my desktop Ubuntu took longer to boot after upgrading from 16 to 18, and I was curious if the text-mode server edition would reflect the same. Since I had no data on this machine anyway, I upgraded to obtain that data point.

The verdict is yes, Ubuntu 18 server takes longer to boot as well. Power button to login prompt now takes 96 seconds, almost double the time for ubuntu 16 server. Actually more than double, considering some portion of that time was hardware initialization and GRUB boot selection timeout before the operating system even started loading.

That was disappointing, but there is an even more interesting experiment: What if, instead of treating this old computer as a server, I treat it as an embedded device? After all, its ~1 GHz CPU and ~1 GB RAM is roughly on par with a Raspberry Pi, and its ~30GB HDD is in the ballpark of microSD cards used in a Pi.

This is the new Ubuntu Core option for bare-bones installations, targeting IoT and other embedded projects. There is an i386 image already available to be installed on the hard drive of this 14-year old Dell laptop. Since Ubuntu Core targets connected devices, I needed a network adapter for initial setup. It looks like the Latitude X1’s WiFi adapter is not supported, but fortunately its wired Ethernet port worked.

Once up and running, I timed its boot time from power switch to login prompt: 35 seconds. Subtracting non-OS overhead, booting Ubuntu 18 Core takes almost half the time of Ubuntu 16 Server, or approaching one quarter of Ubuntu 18 Server. Very nice.

Ubuntu 18 Core makes this old laptop interesting again. Here is a device offering computing power in the ballpark of a Raspberry Pi, plus a display, keyboard, and mouse. (There’s a battery, too, but its degraded capacity barely counts.) It is far too slow to be a general desktop machine, but now it is potentially a viable platform for an embedded device project.

The story of this old workhorse is not yet over…

Dell XPS M1330 Battery Pack Teardown

We had an earlier success tearing down a Dell laptop battery pack, where the six salvaged cells still have 70% of original capacity after ten years of service. However, that was from a laptop that could still boot and run from its battery pack. This XPS M1330 battery pack is in far worse shape. How much worse, we were about to find out.

The first critical detail was realizing the battery pack was not the original Dell battery pack. It is an aftermarket type of unknown manufacture. The earlier battery pack tear down yielded Samsung cells, we’re probably not going to get anything nearly as nice this time around.

Once the case was cracked open the suspicion was confirmed: These appear to be generic 18650-sized lithium cells with no manufacturer branding. The nine cells of the battery pack were divided into three modules in series, each module had three cells wired in parallel. The module in the worst shape exhibited severe corrosion and had no voltage across their terminals.

 

The other two modules were in slightly better shape, but they have self-discharged down to approximately 1 volt DC, well under the recommended voltage range. A web search found some details on what happens to overly discharged lithium cells. In short: the chemistry inside the cell starts dissolving itself. If recharged, the dissolved metals may reform in inconvenient ways. Trying to use these cells has three potential outcomes:

  1. Best case: The metals dissolved into the electrolyte will hamper chemical reaction, resulting in reduced capacity.
  2. Medium case: The dissolved metals will reform in a way that damages the cell, causing it to fail as an open-circuit. (As if no battery was present.)
  3. Worst case: The dissolved metals will reform in a way that damages the cell, but causing it to fail as a closed circuit. Short-circuiting the internals will release a lot of energy very quickly, resulting in high-pressure venting and/or fire.

The corroded cells that have discharged down to zero volts have the highest risk and will be discarded. The remaining cells will be slowly (and carefully) charged back up to gauge their behavior.

Dell XPS M1330 Power Port Salvaged Using Desoldering Tool

Recently a dead Dell XPS M1330 came across the workbench. The battery was dead and the machine fails to boot. After some effort at reviving the machine, it was declared hopeless and salvage operations began. Today’s effort focuses on the motherboard port for the AC power adapter.

Dell Octagonal PowerThe power plug on this Dell different from the typical Dell laptop AC adapter: octagonal in shape rather than round. The shape meant it could not be used on other Dell laptops designed for the round plug. However, the dimensions of the octagon are such that an AC power adapter with the typical round Dell plug fits and could be used to charge the laptop. So while the laptop could be charged with any existing Dell-compatible AC adapter, the AC adapter that came with this machine is specific to this Dell.

Once the XPS M1330 died, its octagonal plug power adapter is not useful for other Dell laptops. It still functions as a power supply transforming household AC to ~19V DC so it might be useful for future projects. To preserve this possibility, the octagonal power port will be recovered from the system board.

The solder used in Dell assembly was possibly one of the lead-free types and is definitely reluctant to melt and flow. Trying to desolder the power port using hand tools (desoldering wick and hand suction pump) had no luck. So this project was chosen as a practice run of using a dedicated desoldering tool, in this case a Hakko 808. The tip of this tool heats up to melt the solder, and with a press of the trigger an electric vacuum pump pulls the melted solder through center channel of the heated tip and into a chamber for later disposal.

The desoldering pump was able to remove more solder than hand tools could, but was still not quite enough to free the port. Using a soldering iron, some user-friendly leaded solder was worked back into the joints to mix with the remaining Dell factory solder. Upon second application of the electric desoldering tool, enough solder was removed to free the port from the system board with only minimal damage.

 

A test with the voltage meter confirmed this port is now ready to be used to provide ~19V DC power to a future project.

Socket Extraction Success