Learned About Home Assistant From ESPHome Via WLED

I thought Adafruit’s IO platform was a great service for building network-connected devices. If my current project had been something I wanted to be internet-accessible with responses built on immediate data, then that would be a great choice. However, my current intent is for something locally at home and I wanted the option to query and analyze long term data, so I started looking at Home Assistant instead.

I found out about Home Assistant in a roundabout way. The path started with a tweet from GeekMomProjects:

A cursory look at WLED’s home page told me it is a project superficially similar to Ben Hencke’s Pixelblaze: an ESP8266/ESP32-based platform for building network-connected projects that light up individually addressable LED arrays. The main difference I saw was of network control. A Pixelblaze is well suited for standalone execution, and the network interface is primarily to expose its web-based UI for programming effects. There are ways to control a Pixelblaze over the network, but they are more advanced scenarios. In contrast, WLED’s own interface for standalone effects are dominated by less sophisticated lighting schemes. For anything more sophisticated, WLED has an API for control over the network from other devices.

The Pixelblaze sensor board is a good illustration of this difference: it is consistent with Pixelblaze design to run code that reacts to its environment with the aid of a sensor board. There’s no sensor board peripheral for a WLED: if I want to build a sensor-reactive LED project using WLED, I would build something else with a sensor, and send commands over the network to control WLED lights.

So what would these other network nodes look like? Following some links led me to the ESPHome project. This is a platform for building small network-connected devices using ESP8266/ESP32 as its network gateway, with a library full of templates we can pick up and use. It looks like WLED is an advanced and specialized relative of ESPHome nodes like their adaptation of the FastLED library. I didn’t dig deeper to find exactly how closely related they are. What’s more interesting to me right now is that a lot of other popular electronics devices are available in the ESPHome template library, including the INA219 power monitor I’ve got on my workbench. All ready to go, no coding on my part required.

Using an inexpensive ESP as a small sensor input or output node, and offload processing logic somewhere else? This can work really well for my project depending on that “somewhere else.” If we’re talking about some cloud service, then we’re no better off than Adafruit IO. So I was happy to learn ESPHome is tailored to work with Home Assistant, an automation platform I could run locally.

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