Sawppy Wiring Schematic Tests Drive Digi-Key Scheme-It

When I declared Sawppy the Rover has reached version 1.0 and posted instructions online, I was fully aware of the fact that the instructions would be incomplete. Not out of neglect or malice, but out of the fact all of Sawppy is in my head and there will be places where I decided something was obvious enough not to require documentation – and learn I was wrong in that judgement.

Such is the case now. One member of RSSC accepted my invitation to build a Sawppy after my presentation in January, and submitted the feedback that I need to post a schematic of how I’ve wired up Sawppy. I previously submitted this answer as response to a comment on the Hackaday.io project page, but more detail was needed.

The minimum electronics components for a bare-bones Sawppy has [10 * LewanSoul LX-16A] wired in parallel with each other and to [1 * LewanSoul “BusLinker” a.k.a. “Debug Board”] to translate generic USB serial to servo half-duplex serial. That translator board is connected to [1 * Raspberry Pi] via USB.

I thought this was a good opportunity to try Scheme-It from Digit-Key. It is a web-based electronics schematic editor that purports to let people quickly sketch up electronics schematics for sharing. The electrical wiring for a bare-bones Sawppy version 1.0 should be a nice easy exercise for this tool.

The terms and conditions for using Scheme-It is fairly typical for a web-based application. A Digi-Key account is required for login, something I already had from earlier purchases for electronics experiments. In exchange for free use of the software, a user also has to grant Digit-Key a license to the schematic. Not a big deal in this case, as I wanted Sawppy to be shared as widely as possible. And finally, Digi-Key reserves the right to take down this service at any time, deleting all of my data. This is irritating but not unexpected. If this is important to me I better make a copy for my own storage.

Since my sample schematic is fairly simple, it only took about an hour to go from absolute beginner to the schematic I wanted to create. I could (and did) choose to share the project file publicly via a URL, though it appears accessing the project requires logging in to Scheme-It, which required a Digi-Key account as previously mentioned. I could also export to PDF or PNG formats. The PDF export feature was unsatisfactory. Many labels were moved out-of-place making the schematic illegible. In contrast the PNG export looks OK so I’ve posted this schematic PNG to Sawppy’s Hackaday.io project page, as well as Sawppy’s assembly instructions hosted on Github.

Sawppy V1 Schematic

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy at SCaLE 17x: The Trouble with Rovers

My primary obligation for Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x) was to co-present The Trouble with Rovers with Lan Dang on Saturday afternoon. Which meant when Sawppy’s coupler broke Friday evening I had to scramble to fix it for Saturday. A rush repair job is always going to leave some details to be desired but it was sufficient to resume operation.

Sawppy will obviously be one of the visual aids present at our talk, but that doesn’t mean it gets to spend the rest of the day just sitting around. No sir, as soon as Sawppy arrived on location, it immediately started working as a roving billboard for both itself and the talk.

Sawppy Scale 17x Sat 1 - Roving billboard

It was not explicitly coordinated beforehand, but the SGVHAK rover was also equipped with advertising for our talk. Both of our rovers were out and about, pulling roving billboard duty, and occasionally our paths crossed in the hallways of SCaLE.

Sawppy Scale 17x Sat 2 - Two roving billboards

I was happy with the turnout for our rover session. While we did lose a few people who left partway through the talk, it was more than made up for by the enthusiastic people who followed along and came up to ask questions after. I had a lot of fun explaining details on what we did for both rovers, minutiae that we trimmed from the talk proper but was still interesting to our smaller and more technical audience afterwards.

Sawppy Scale 17x Sat 3 - Session

Sawppy continued to roam around Pasadena Convention Center, spreading word of my rover project to people who are excited about the possibility of building their own. Some people thought it would be their motivation to finally buy their own 3D printer, others have all the tools on hand and it’s just a matter of prioritization and finding project time. I was most gratified by a group of students from California State University San Bernardino who thinks it would be a great group project. They are exactly the target audience!

And it’s fun as always to see young children’s faces light up when they see Sawppy, some of whom were eager to take control. My favorite was this 6-year old who loved to drive Sawppy over his own toes over and over.

Sawppy Scale 17x Sat 4 - Self foot runover

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Cracked Sawppy Steering Coupler Almost Survives Full Day of SCaLE 17x

Before I took Sawppy to its first day of SCaLE 17x, I checked over all mechanical bits and found a cracked steering coupler. My first instinct was to repair my rover by replacing the coupler, but I decided against it because it was still partially functional. I wanted to see how my rover design behaves with some partially broken parts, find out how tolerant of faults it would be.

The answer is: surprisingly well! When everything is in newly assembled condition, the steering assembly could keep its wheel steering angle within a few degrees of the desired position. There is still some error due to flex in the PETG plastic through all component interfaces leading from the servo’s output shaft, through the coupler, through the 8mm steering shaft, through the steering knuckle, through the wheel bearing, the bearing axle, and finally the wheel itself.

With a cracked steering coupler, the steering assembly could still hold angle within about a 20 degree range, or +/- 10 degrees of the desired position. This isn’t great, but like its Mars inspirations, Sawppy was able to keep running with a damaged wheel. I was able to do the usual crowd-pleasing demonstrations running over backpacks and feet. While steering was a bit wobbly, Sawppy has five other wheels to compensate and maintain most of its steering authority.

I thought I’d just continue running the rover until something finally gave. And it did, just not the way I expected. Instead of a gradual degradation in rover operation, what finally killed the coupler was a child. About 6-8 years in age, the boy grabbed the steering wheel assembly in both hands and twisted hard. I heard a loud POP and that was the end of the coupler. The boy knew he was going to be in trouble and ran off, the associated adult was apologetic, but that doesn’t change the fact I now have a broken rover.

Here’s a picture from yesterday, with a partially failed coupler:

Sawppy cracked PETG coupler closeup

After abuse by careless child, here’s a fully failed coupler:

Sawppy failed PETG coupler closeup

Yesterday the coupler was cracked below the set screw. Now the crack goes all the way to the top and there’s no longer enough force to hold the heat-set insert in place. Once the heat-set insert popped out of place, its set screw no longer has leverage to grip the detent I cut on the steering shaft. A steering shaft that spins nearly freely makes Sawppy very hard to drive. I was able to move a little bit at the Tindie x Hackaday Birds of a Feather Session, but Sawppy could not perform its usual rover capability demonstrations at the meetup.

Sawppy Steering Coupler Volunteers For Fault Tolerance Test

Whenever I’m getting Sawppy ready for a public appearance, I power up my rover and drive it around a bit to make sure all the mechanical bits are functioning. I did the same for preparation for Sawppy’s appearance at SCaLE 17x and I saw the right front wheel – historically the most problematic part of any rover – is wobblier than I expected.

This usually indicates a set screw is backing out, something that was much reduced after I started using Loctite on the set screws. But when I reached towards the coupler with a wrench to turn the set screw, I realized this situation is different. The PETG plastic for the coupler has cracked.

Sawppy cracked PETG coupler closeup

For context, here’s the non-cropped version of the image to show location of this coupler in Sawppy’s front right wheel assembly.

Sawppy cracked PETG coupler

This is a new failure! And a bit of a surprise, too. My experience with PETG to date has been that it is very tough and willing to flex instead of break like my experience with PLA. It’s held up well through multiple public appearances, driven by enthusiastic children who were none too gentle with the rover. It appears we have finally reached the breaking point for PETG.

Or… have we?

The rover is still driving and nominally functioning. System performance has degraded but strictly speaking, the system has not yet failed. The crack allowed more movement in wheel steering than designed, but the movement is still constrained instead of turning freely out of control. I would call the latter case, which happened to Sawppy earlier, an actual failure. This isn’t quite it.

And now I’m curious about what potential stages of system degradation will be, so I’m going to leave the cracked coupler in place for now. I will build a replacement and have it on hand for a field repair, but the cracked coupler has just volunteered itself for a test of Sawppy fault tolerance. How much further can Sawppy go on a cracked coupler?

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy and SGVHAK Rover will be at SCaLE 17x

This year’s Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x) begins today. Four days of talks across multiple tracks focusing on topics relating to the flagship open source operating system in various ways. From small micro controllers to large cloud infrastructure. Last year’s SCaLE served as deadline and motivation for completing SGVHAK Rover, but it was only for purposes of show and tell. We couldn’t yet do a full presentation as the JPL Open Source Rover project has yet to officially launch until mid year.

But that is no longer a concern, and we even have spinoff projects like my Sawppy rover to add to the mix. Hence Sawppy will be part of our SGVHAK presentation “The Trouble with Rovers“: they’re never really finished, and their numbers keep growing. Rovers are such cool projects to work on there’s always more upgrades and evolution we can perform to make our rovers better. Lan and I practiced this talk at last month’s SGVLUG meetup and hopefully our presentation will be better for it! We’ll be presenting Saturday afternoon 4:30-5:30pm in Ballroom G.

20190214 Rovers at SGVLUG

Sawppy will also be present at the Tindie+Hackaday Bring-a-Hack meetup, under their “Birds of a Feather” event umbrella for groups to get a space and meet. It is a free event (with at least a SCaLE Expo Pass) and Sawppy will be there as representative of one of the projects with a page on Hackaday.io. This will take place Friday evening 7pm-8pm in Ballroom B.

Beyond those events, Sawppy will be generally hanging out and cruising about the event and the expo floor. There’ll probably be some time spent at the SGVLUG/SGVHAK booth, but no official scheduled events beyond the two above.

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

SGVHAK Rover, Sawppy, and Phoebe at SGVLUG February 2019 Meeting

At the February 2019 meet for San Gabriel Valley Linux User’s Group (SGVLUG), Lan and I presented the story of rover building in our hardware hackers spinoff group a.k.a. SGVHAK. This is a practice run for our presentation at Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE) in March. Naturally, the rovers themselves had to be present as visual aids.

20190214 Rovers at SGVLUG

We started the story in January 2018, when Lan gathered the SGVHAK group to serve as beta testers for Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Open Source Rover project. Then we went through our construction process, which was greatly motivated by our desire to have SGVHAK rover up and running at least year’s SCaLE. Having a rover at SCaLE was not the end, it was only the beginning. I started building my own rover Sawppy, and SGVHAK rover continued to pick up hardware upgrades along the way.

On the software side, we have ambition to increase sophistication by adapting the open source Robot Operation System (ROS) which led to a small digression to Phoebe, my tool for learning ROS. Getting a rover to work effectively under ROS poses some significant challenges that we have yet to address, but if it was easy it wouldn’t be fun!

Since this was a practice talk, the Q&A session at the end was also a forum for feedback on how we could improve the talk for SCaLE. We had some good suggestions on how we might have a better smoother narrative through the story, and we’ll see what we can figure out by March.

Sawppy at Brawerman East STEAM Makers Fair

Sawppy’s publicity appearance today was at Brawerman East STEAM Makers Fair, a supercharged science fair at a private elementary school. Sawppy earned this invitation by the way of January presentation at Robotics Society of Southern California. The intent is to show students that building things is more than their assignments at their on campus Innovation Lab, there are bigger projects they can strive for beyond the classroom. But the format is, indeed, just like a school science fair, where Sawppy got a display table and a poster board.

Brawerman STEAM Makers Fair - Sawppy on table

But Sawppy is not very interesting sitting on a table, it didn’t take long before the rover started roving amongst other exhibits. The school’s 3D printer is visible on the left – a Zortrax M200.

Brawerman STEAM Makers Fair - Sawppy roaming

Sawppy was not the only project from grown-ups present. I admire the ambition of this laser cutter project undertaken by one of the parents. Look at the size of that thing. It is currently a work in progress, and its incomplete wiring were completely removed for this event so little fingers are not tempted to unplug things and possibly plugging them in a wrong place.

Brawerman STEAM Makers Fair - laser cutter

The center of this tables had some old retired electronics equipment that kids will be able to take apart. This was a huge hit at the event, but by the end of the night this side of the room was a huge mess of tiny plastic pieces scattered all over.

Brawerman STEAM Makers Fair - deconstruction zone

I brought my iPad with the idea I could have Sawppy’s Onshape CAD data visible for browsing, but it turned out the iOS Onshape app required a live internet connection and refused to work from cache. As an alternate activity, I rigged it up to show live video footage from Sawppy’s onboard camera. This was surprisingly popular with the elementary school age crowd, who got a kick out of making faces at the camera and seeing their faces on the iPad. I need to remember to do this for future Sawppy outings.

Brawerman STEAM Makers Fair - Sawppy camera ipad

After Sawppy was already committed to the event, I learned that a Star Wars themed art car was also going to be present. So I mentioned my #rxbb8 project which earned me a prime parking spot on the first floor next to the far more extensively modified “Z-Wing.” Prepare to jump to hyperspace!

rxbb8zwingcropped

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy at Space Carnival Long Beach

Sawppy at Space Carnival Long Beach

Space Carnival, held at the Expo Arts Center in Long Beach, California, welcomed Sawppy as one of several exhibits Monday afternoon. It turned out to be part of a week-long LEGO robotics camp for elementary school students. Most of the events are for campers, but the Monday evening Space Carnival was open to the public.

Since the focus is on LEGO, there were plenty of plastic bricks in attendance. The middle of the room had a big pile of bricks on a plastic tarp and kids were crawling all over the pile building their creations. Sawppy mostly spent time outside of the tarp, occasionally venturing on to some of the colorful game boards for LEGO robots to line-follow and other tasks.

Sawppy at Space Carnival Long Beach LEGO tarp

As usual, I handed controls over for kids in attendance to play with. Running over feet is still more popular of an event than I can hope to understand but, if it makes them excited, so be it.

Sawppy at Space Carnival Long Beach running over feet

Sawppy was not the only non-LEGO robot in attendance, there were also a selection of Star Wars licensed merchandise including this R2D2. I forgot if this particular unit was made by Sphero or Hasbro.

Sawppy at Space Carnival Long Beach R2D2

This event was not the first time I crossed paths with Barnabas Robotics, but it was the first time I got to speak with them beyond the standard sales pitch type of discussions. Since their business is STEM education for students K-12, they have a good feel of what type of material is appropriate for various age groups. It’s possible Sawppy can find a role in high school curriculum.

At the end of the night, the LEGO tarp cleared out enough for me to drive Sawppy across the field. Unfortunately I saw Emily’s tweet too late to replicate the movie clip she had suggested. Maybe another day!

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy Has A Busy Schedule This Week

Since the time I declared Sawppy version 1.0 (mechanical maturity), I’ve been taking my rover out to various events. From casual social gatherings to large official events to presentation in front of others who might appreciate my project. Sawppy has been a great icebreaker for me to start talking with people about their interests, and sometimes this leads to even more events added to Sawppy’s event calendar. This coming week will be especially busy.

Space Carnival

On Monday February 11th from 3pm-6:30pm Sawppy will be at Space Carnival, a FIRST Themed Event on Lincoln’s Birthday. Held at Expo Arts Center, a community space in Long Beach, CA. This event is organized by people behind local FIRST robotics teams. This year’s competition is titled “Destination: Deep Space” and has a very explicit space exploration angle to all the challenges. So even though Sawppy is nothing like a FIRST robotics competitor, an invitation was still extended to join the fun.

This event will be unique in that I had the option to be a roaming exhibit and I chose it for novelty. I think a rover who is roving will be much more engaging than a rover sitting on a table. It also means I will not be tied to a booth, so I could check out other exhibitors as I roam around with Sawppy. This eliminates the problem I had with Sawppy at DTLA Mini Maker Faire – I had to stay in one place for most of the event and couldn’t see what other people had brought.

On Wednesday February 13th Sawppy will join a STEAM Maker’s Fair at Brawerman East, a private elementary school. This is a small event catering to students and parents at the school. I believe the atmosphere will be similar to a school science fair, with exhibits of student projects. To augment these core exhibits, Sawppy and a few others were invited. The intent is to show that concepts covered in their on-campus Innovation Lab projects are just as applicable to bigger projects outside of their class.

And finally, on Thursday Februarh 14th Sawppy will be part of another SGVLUG presentation. A follow-up to the previous rover themed SGVLUG presentation, this will still set up background but will talk more about what has happened since our initial rover construction. This also serves as a practice run for a presentation to be given at Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE) next month.

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy Odometry Candidate: Flow Breakout Board

When I presented Sawppy the Rover at Robotics Society of Southern California, one of the things I brought up as an open problems is how to determine Sawppy’s movement through its environment. Wheel odometry is sufficient for a robot traveling on flat ground like Phoebe, but when Sawppy travels on rough terrain things can get messy in more ways than one.

In the question-and-answer session some people brought up the idea of calculating odometry by visual means, much in the way a modern optical computer mouse determines its movement on a desk. This is something I could whip up with a downward pointing webcam and open source software, but there are also pieces of hardware designed specifically to perform this task. One example is the PWM3901 chip, which I could experiment using breakout boards like this item on Tindie.

However, that visual calculation is only part of the challenge, because translating what that camera sees into a physical dimension requires one more piece of data: the distance from the camera to the surface it is looking at. Depending on application, this distance might be a known quantity. But for robotic applications where the distance may vary, a distance sensor would be required.

As a follow-up to my presentation, RSSC’s online discussion forum brought up the Flow Breakout Board. This is an interesting candidate for helping Sawppy gain awareness of how it is moving through its environment (or failing to do so, as the case may be.) A small lightweight module that puts the aforementioned PWM3901 chip alongside a VL53L0x distance sensor.

flow_breakout_585px-1

The breakout board only handles the electrical connections – an external computer or microcontroller will be necessary to make the whole system sing. That external module will need to communicate with PWM3901 via SPI and, separately, VL53L0x via I2C. Then it will need perform the math to calculate actual X-Y distance traveled. This in itself isn’t a problem.

The problem comes from the fact a PWM3901 was designed to be used on small multirotor aircraft to aid them in holding position. Two design decisions that make sense for its intended purpose turns out to be a problem for Sawppy.

  1. This chip is designed to help hold position, which is why it was not concerned with knowing the height above surface or physical dimension of that translation: the sensor was only concerned with detecting movement so the aircraft can be brought back to position.
  2. Multirotor aircraft all have built-in gyroscopes to stabilize itself, so they already detect rotation about their Z axis. Sawppy has no such sensor and would not be able to calculate its position in global space if it doesn’t know how much it has turned in place.
  3. Multirotor aircraft are flying in the air, so the designed working range of 80mm to infinity is perfectly fine. However, Sawppy has only 160mm between the bottom of the equipment bay and nominal floor distance. If traversing over obstacles more than 80mm tall, or rough terrain bringing surface within 80mm of the sensor, this sensor would become disoriented.

This is a very cool sensor module that has a lot of possibilities, and despite its potential problems it has been added to the list of things to try for Sawppy in the future.

ROS In Three Dimensions: Navigation and Planning Will Be Hard

backyard sawppy 1600At this point my research has led me to ROS modules RTAB-Map which will create a three dimensional representation of a robot’s environment. It seems very promising… but building such a representation is only half the battle. How would a robot make good use of this data? My research has not yet uncovered applicable solutions.

The easy thing to do is to fall back to two dimensions, which will allow the use of standard ROS navigation stack. The RTAB-Map ROS module appears to make the super easy, with the option to output a two dimension occupancy grid just like what navigation wants. It is a baseline for handling indoor environments, navigating from room to room and such.

But where’s the fun in that? I could already do that with a strictly two-dimensional Phoebe. Sawppy is a six wheel rover for handling rougher terrain and it would be far preferable to make Sawppy autonomous with ROS modules that can understand and navigate outdoor environments. But doing so successfully will require solving a lot of related problems that I don’t have answers yet.

We can see a few challenges in the picture of Sawppy in a back yard environment:

  • Grass is a rough surface that would be very noisy to robot sensors due to individual blades of grass. With its six wheel drivetrain, Sawppy can almost treat grassy terrain as flat ground. But not quite! There are hidden dangers – like sprinkler heads – which could hamper movement and should be considered in path planning.
  • In the lower right corner we can see transition from grass to flat red brick. This would show as a transition to robot sensors as well, but deciding whether that transition is important will need to be part of path planning. It even introduces a new consideration in the form of direction: Sawppy has no problem dropping from grass to brick, but it takes effort to climb from brick back on to grass. This asymmetry in cost would need to be accounted for.
  • In the upper left corner we see a row of short bricks. An autonomous Sawppy would need to evaluate those short bricks and decide if they could be climbed, or if they are obstacles to be avoided. Experimentally I have found that they are obstacles, but how would Sawppy know that? Or more interestingly: how would Sawppy perform its own experiment autonomously?

So many interesting problems, so little time!

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

ROS In Three Dimensions: Data Structure and Sensor

rosorg-logo1One of the ways a TurtleBot makes ROS easier and more approachable for beginners is by simplifying a robot’s world into two dimensions. It’s somewhat like the introductory chapters of a physics textbook, where all surfaces are friction-less and all collisions are perfectly inelastic. The world of a TurtleBot is perfectly flat and all obstacles have an infinite height. This simplification allows the robot’s environment to be represented as a 2D array called an occupancy grid.

Of course, the real world is more complicated. My TurtleBot clone Phoebe encountered several problems just trying to navigate my home. The real world do not have flat floors and obstacles come in all shapes, sizes, and heights. Fortunately, researchers have been working on problems encountered by robots venturing outside the simplified world, it’s a matter of reading research papers and following their citation links to find the tools.

One area of research improves upon the 2D occupancy grid by building data structures that can represent a robot’s environment in 3D. I’ve found several papers that built upon the octree concept, so that seems to be a good place to start.

But for a robot to build a representation of its environment in 3D, it needs 3D sensors. Phoebe’s Neato vacuum LIDAR works in a simplified 2D world but won’t cut it anymore in a 3D world. The most affordable entry point here is the Microsoft Kinect sensor bar from an old Xbox 360, which can function as a RGBD (red + blue + green + depth) input source for ROS.

Phoebe used Gmapping for SLAM, but that takes 2D laser scan data and generates a 2D occupancy grid. Searching for a 3D SLAM algorithm that can digest RGBD camera data, I searched for “RGBD SLAM” that led immediately to this straightforwardly named package. But of course, that’s not the only one around. I’ve also come across RTAB-Map which seems to be better maintained and updated for recent ROS releases. And best of all, RTAB-Map has the ability to generate odometry data purely from the RGBD input stream, which might allow me to bypass the challenges of calculating Sawppy’s chassis odometry from unreliable servo angle readings.

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy on ROS: Open Problems

A great side effect of giving a presentation is that it requires me to gather my thoughts in order to present them to others. Since members of RSSC are familar with ROS, I collected my scattered thoughts on ROS over the past few weeks and condensed the essence into a single slide that I’ve added to my presentation.

backyard sawppy 1600

From building and running my Phoebe robot, I learned about the basics of ROS using a two-wheeled robot on flat terrain. Sticking to 2D simplifies a lot of robotics problems and I thought it would help me expand to a six-wheeled rover to rough terrain. Well, I was right on the former but the latter is still a big step to climb.

The bare basic responsibilities of a ROS TurtleBot chassis (and derivatives like Phoebe) is twofold: subscribe to topic /cmd_vel and execute movement commands published to that topic, and from the resulting movement, calculate and publish odometry data to topic /odom.

Executing commands sent to /cmd_vel is relatively straightforward when Sawppy is on level ground. It would not terribly different from existing code. The challenge comes from uneven terrain with unpredictable traction. Some of Sawppy’s wheels might slip and resulting motion might be very different from what was commanded. My experience with Phoebe showed that while it is possible to correct for minor drift, major sudden unexpected shifts in position or orientation (such as when Phoebe runs into an unseen obstacle) throws everything out of whack.

Given the potential for wheel slip on uneven terrain, calculating Sawppy odometry is a challenge. And that’s before we consider another problem: the inexpensive serial bus servos I use do not have fine pitched rotation encoders, just a sensor for servo angle that only covers ~240 of 360 degrees. While I would be happy if it just didn’t return any data when out of range, it actually returns random data. I haven’t yet figured out a good way to filter the signal out of the noise, which would be required to calculate odometry.

And these are just challenges within the chassis I built, there’s more out there!

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy Presented at January 2019 RSSC Meeting

Today I introduced my rover project Sawppy to members of Robotics Society of Southern California. Before the presentations started, Sawppy sat on a table so interested people can come by for a closer look. My visual aid PowerPoint slide deck is available here.

sawppy at rssc

My presentation is an extended version of what I gave at Downtown LA Mini Maker Faire. Some of the addition came at the beginning: this time I’m not following a JPL Open Source Rover presentation, so I had to give people the background story on ROV-E, JPL OSR, and SGVHAK rover to properly explain Sawppy’s inspiration. Some of the addition came at the end: there were some technical details that I was able to discuss with a technical audience. (I’ll expand on them in future blog posts.)

I was very happy at the positive reception I received for Sawppy. The first talk of the morning covered autonomous robots, so I was afraid the audience would look down at Sawppy’s lack of autonomy. Thankfully that did not turn out to be a big deal. Many were impressed by the mechanical design and construction. Quite a few were also appreciative when I stressed my emphasis on keeping Sawppy affordable and accessible. In the Q&A session we covered a few issues that had easy solutions… if one had a metalworking machine shop. I insisted that Sawppy could be built without a machine shop, and that’s why I made some of the design decisions I did.

A few people were not aware of Onshape and my presentation stirred their interest to look into it. There was also a surprising level of interest in my mention of Monoprice Maker Select v2 as an affordable entry level 3D printer, enough hands were raised that I signed up to give a future talk about my experience.

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy Will Be Presented At RSSC

Roger Sawppy

I brought Sawppy to the Downtown Los Angeles Mini Maker Faire this past December, where I had the opportunity to give a short presentation about my project. (Above.) Also at the event were the Robotics Society of Southern California (RSSC) and a few members asked if I would be interested in presenting Sawppy at an upcoming RSSC meeting.

Since I’m always happy to share Sawppy with anyone interested in my little rover, I said yes and I’m on their calendar for the RSSC meeting on Saturday, January 12th. From 11AM to noon, I plan to talk for about 35-40 minutes and leave the remaining time for Q&A and drive Sawppy over obstacles to demonstrate the rocker-bogie suspension.

This group has collective expertise in Robot Operating System, which I’ve been learning on-and-off at a self guided pace. If conversations go in a direction where it makes sense, I’ll be asking my audience for their input on how to best put Sawppy on ROS. I also plan to bring Phoebe, my ROS TurtleBot clone that I built to learn ROS, just for fun.

And I’m sure I’ll see other cool robotics projects there!

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy Post-Faire Cleanup

When I work on Sawppy, I test and run indoors. At DTLA Maker Faire Sawppy ran all over, both indoors and out. Most of the time people were playing with Sawppy on a piece of artificial turf at Maguire Gardens. This is an outdoor space where people would walk their dogs, raising obvious sanitation concerns running Sawppy on my home carpet after the event.

Well, after a long day of work, who doesn’t enjoy kicking off their shoes and soaking their feet? I could give Sawppy the same royal treatment. All six wheels were removed and soaked in a tub filled with a mixture of water and household bleach. A retired toothbrush was used to scrub off dirt particles clinging to the wheel. Hopefully this removed most of the contaminants Sawppy might have picked up during the event.

Sawppy kicks off shoes

It was also a good time to perform an inspection to see how Sawppy held up mechanically. In addition to the set screw mentioned yesterday, a few chassis mounting screws have fallen out and need to be replaced. I designed plenty of redundancy in these mounts so there was little risk of Sawppy falling apart.

Sawppy lost fasteners

After a few hours of soaking, the wheels were hung up to dry like old socks. What has six rover wheels but is not a rover? This laundry rack.

Sawppy laundry

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy at DTLA Mini Maker Faire

Yesterday Sawppy went on an adventure to the downtown Los Angeles Mini Maker Faire. There Sawppy found a receptive and appreciative audience. There were a lot of enchanted kids, interested parents, and other makers who might be building their own Sawppy rovers.

The morning started out with Sawppy sitting on a table alongside a few different builds of JPL open source rover. Eric’s build is on the left in black and white, Santa Susana High School build is on the right with purple printed parts.

Taking Sawppy around and talking to individuals about Sawppy was a lot of fun and something I’ve done in other contexts before. I have hopes for a few of the contacts to develop into something cool for Sawppy’s future. What’s new this time was that I also signed up to give a short 15-minute presentation about Sawppy and that took more work and preparation. Thanks to the 2-minute “lightning talk” opportunities at Hackaday LA the past few months I’m less nervous about public speaking than I used to be, but I still got pretty stressed about it. I’m sure it’s a matter of practice and the more I can take advantage of such opportunities the better I’ll get.

Roger Sawppy

Outside of the presentation, Sawppy and I spent most of our time on the astroturf across the walkway from the officially assigned display area. It was a hilly part of the park which meant there were no tables or booths set up there, and it was a good place to demonstrate rover suspension in action. I had a spare phone set up to be Sawppy control and handed the control to anyone who wanted to pilot Sawppy for a bit.

Sawppy on lawn.jpg

Most were content to run around the turf. Some of the little ones tried to run Sawppy into their siblings. A few ran into the bushes beyond the turf for a more rugged demonstration of Sawppy chassis. A perpetual favorite is to have Sawppy climb over shoes.

Sawppy running over feet

Thanks to refinements to improve robustness over the past few months, Sawppy came out of the experience with only a slightly wobbly left rear wheel that was easily repaired by tightening the set screw on the left rear steering servo coupler. A great improvement over earlier outings!

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy Will Be At DTLA Mini Maker Faire

The Downtown Los Angeles (DTLA) Mini Maker Faire, hosted at the Los Angeles Public Library central location, is coming up this weekend and my rover Sawppy will be among the many maker projects at the event.

DTLA Mini Maker Faire Website

Sawppy will be one of several rovers present. JPL’s Open Source Rover team should be there with their original build, SGVHAK will be there with the beta build rover I contributed to, which inspired my Sawppy and they’ll all be hanging out together.

The JPL team will also be giving a brief presentation in the KLOS Children’s Theater upstairs about their rover project, followed by an even briefer presentation by me on building Sawppy. Both of these talks are listed on the workshop schedule though (as far as I know) there is no hands-on workshop activity planned. Sawppy will be present and running for people to see up close, but no assembly (and certainly no disassembly!) is planned. I may bring an extra corner steering unit for people to play with, and they’ll be welcome to take that apart and put it back together, but not much beyond that.

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Sawppy Sees Brief Internet Fame

A few days ago I noticed a sudden spike in internet traffic to Sawppy – page views on my personal blog, Sawppy’s Hackaday.io project page, the Github repo, and YouTube video all rose dramatically. It took a little digging around various statistics reporting pages to figure out where the interest was coming from. Answer: someone had submitted Sawppy to Hacker News giving Sawppy a brief taste of internet fame.

Given the general attention span of the internet at large, the traffic disappeared just as quickly as it came. But in that brief moment in time, a few thousand people spared a few seconds (or more) of their lives to look over Sawppy and that’s more than what I had before.

Sawppy SpikeAnd this bit of exposure might lead to other interesting projects down the line. It seems to have caught the eye of someone with interest in the Pi Wars robot competition. Sawppy’s current configuration is indeed controlled by a Raspberry Pi, but according to contest rules Sawppy is too big to fit as-is. I’m not sure a six-wheeled rocker-bogie suspension would be useful for any contest objectives (challenges) in Pi Wars. But it would absolutely make my day if I see one of the competitors downscale Sawppy to fit in the size envelope, thereby creating a “Sawppy Jr.”

(Cross-posted to Hackaday.io)

Dell Inspiron 11 3000 (3180) As Robot Brain Candidate

Well, I should have seen this coming. Right after I wrote I wanted to be disciplined about buying hardware, that I wanted to wait until I know what I actually needed, a temptation rises to call for a change in plans. Now I have a Dell Inspiron 11 3000 (3180) on its way even though I don’t yet know if it’ll be a good ROS brain for Sawppy the Rover.

Dell Notebook Inspiron 11 3000 3180

The temptation was Dell’s Labor Day sale. This machine in its bare-bones configuration has a MSRP of $200 and can frequently be found on sale for $170-$180. To kick off their sale event, Dell made a number of them available for $130 and that was too much to resist.

This particular hardware chassis is also sold as a Dell Chromebook, so the hardware specs are roughly in line with the Chromebook comments in my previous post. We’ll start with the least exciting item: the heart is a low-end dual-core x86 CPU, an AMD E2-9000e that’s basically the bottom of the totem pole for Intel-compatible processors. But it is a relatively modern 64-bit chip enabling options (like WSL) not available on the 32-bit-only CPUs inside my Acer Aspire or Latitude X1.

The CPU is connected to 4GB of RAM, far more than the 1GB of a Raspberry Pi and hopefully a comfortable amount for sensor data processing. Main storage is listed as 32GB of eMMC flash memory which is better than a microSD card of a Pi, if only by a little. The more promising aspect of this chassis is the fact that it is also sometimes sold with a cheap spinning platter hard drive so the chassis can accommodate either type of storage as confirmed by the service manual. If I’m lucky (again), I might be able to swap it out with a standard solid state hard drive and put Ubuntu on it.

It has most of the peripherals expected of a modern laptop. Screen, keyboard, trackpad, and a webcam that might be repurposed for machine vision. The accessory that’s the most interesting for Sawppy is a USB 3 port necessary for a potential depth camera. As a 11″ laptop, it should easily fit within Sawppy’s equipment bay with its lid closed. The most annoying hardware tradeoff for its small size? This machine does not have a hard-wired Ethernet port, something even a Raspberry Pi has. I hope its on-board wireless networking is solid!

And lastly – while this computer has Chromebook-level hardware, this particular unit is sold with Windows 10 Home. Having the 64-bit edition installed from the factory should in theory allow Windows Subsystem for Linux. This way I have a backup option to run ROS even if I can’t replace the eMMC storage module with a SSD. (And not bold enough to outright destroy the Windows 10 installation on eMMC.)

Looking at the components in this package, this is a great deal: 4GB of DDR4 laptop memory is around $40 all on its own. A standalone license of Windows 10 Home has MSRP of $100. That puts us past the $130 price tag even before considering the rest of the laptop. If worse comes to worst, I could transfer the RAM module out to my Inspiron 15 for a memory boost.

But it shouldn’t come to that, I’m confident even if this machine proves to be insufficient as Sawppy’s ROS brain, the journey to that enlightenment will be instructive enough to be worth the cost.